More on growing herbs

I love growing herbs – they are so easy to grow and hardy, and have so many uses and health benefits. Check out my latest Mother Earth News post about growing, harvesting, and using basil:

“Basil is very easy to grow from seed. You can sow the seeds either directly in the soil or in a large pot – placed out of doors or even near a sunny window. In either case, make sure not to buy them too deep. Basil likes warmth and partial sunshine – mine thrives in a spot where it gets sunshine in the morning and shade in the afternoon. Full sun is unnecessary and may even be excessive in hot, dry climates.”

 

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More on Herb Gardening

Luckily for me, I live in an area where the earth never freezes, and thus, every season is a good season for digging! Now contemplating options of enlarging my herb patch (in ways that won’t encourage the chickens to dust bathe and upturn every single one of my young plants).

Read more on herb gardening in my latest Mother Earth News post:

“My herb garden is my favorite, most useful, most versatile and easiest to maintain green patch. Once herbs get going, they’re extremely easy to grow and only require minimal care. They don’t need a lot of space or water, and can be tucked into nooks where you can’t grow much else. Many herbs boast of wonderful medicinal properties and a whole array of culinary uses. In fact, for someone just establishing a garden, I’d recommend to get started with herbs.”

Propagating lavender

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I’ve wanted some lavender for my herb garden for a while now. Lavender has many wonderful medicinal properties, and besides, I love the way it smells. Satchels of dried lavender are lovely to place in a closet or other confined space for a gentle perfume.

You can grow lavender from seed or from cuttings. When choosing cuttings, make sure they are green and fresh, and have no blossoms, as those will divert the plant’s energy from developing roots.

I have tried to propagate lavender in the past by taking cuttings, placing them in a container of water and waiting for them to put out roots, but it never worked (unlike it did with mint and rosemary), but recently I have stumbled upon a much simpler and more effective method: just stick your cuttings in a flower pot with potting soil, place it on a sunny windowsill, keep the soil moist, and the cuttings will take root before long. Once the weather is warm enough, you can transfer your plant outside – around here, this is year round, and my herbs all grow perennially.

The fading summer

A nostalgic post from our old home – a look at our then-garden:

It’s time to take another stroll and feel the strengthening winds of autumn. Pick up some herbs for herb tea…

Look at some of the young trees hopefully awaiting the next season of life and warmth to bear fruit…

And see how the grape vine is waving goodbye with leaves that are falling one by one.

Yes, I know that some of our friends overseas are already shoveling snow, but for us it’s barely fall, and I’m looking forward to cooler weather, rain, and winter flowers.

One afternoon in the garden

It’s summer… warm, lovely summer with long days, homemade popsicles, water balloons, and everything growing like mad.

As you can see above, our sage plants, after a long latent stage as poor little sticks, have grown to be mighty bushes. And our tomatoes, though still green, are already very promising. I also put in some new pepper plants.

Here is also one very annoyed mama hen. Doesn’t her whole attitude speak very plainly: “Do not get close to my chicks, or else?” After a heartbreaking result with our previous batch of chicks – some sort of predator dug its way into the coop and just made off with all our chicks, plus two of my favorite chickens, leaving absolutely no trace – I spent hours reinforcing the base of our coop with local rock. I know pouring concrete around the base would have been more effective, but we just can’t afford this right now.

Anyway, we now have fifteen new chicks, and I’m keeping my fingers crossed. I hope we can raise them into nice stock of pullets who will lay plenty of eggs for us in a few months.

Improving your soil

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We don’t have ideal soil – to put it mildly. It is heavy and has a high clay content; it’s muddy and slippery in winter, and sticks to rubber boots until we have clogs so heavy we can hardly lift our feet. Once the rainy season is over and it dries up, it becomes rock hard. Oh, and it’s also full of actual rocks, large and small, which makes clearing up space for a garden bed one challenging job. Using raised beds with imported high-quality soil has been great, but would I like to have friendlier soil all over our property? Sure!

Read more in my latest Mother Earth News post:

“Practically any soil – whether it’s sandy, or has a high clay content, or is somewhere in between – can benefit from generous amounts of organic material being worked into it. Back when we used to keep goats, there was a place in our yard with plenty of brush that needed to be cleared and I often tethered the goats there. Apart from the brush it was pretty arid, but next year, beautiful tall lush grass sprung up there as if by magic. It was goat manure, left over winter to rot and decompose, that did the trick.”