Garlic: a wonderful natural remedy

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The anti-inflammatory and health-promoting qualities of garlic have been known for thousands of years, and we include fresh crushed garlic in many sauces, spreads, dips and salads that are served around here. Recently, I have taken this a step further and began using garlic to promote the health of my poultry.

Read more here:

“It’s surprising that I didn’t think twice before giving my young peafowl antibiotics in increasingly strong doses for persistent respiratory symptoms. The birds, however, not only didn’t get better, but appeared weaker. An experienced friend whom I consulted recommended that I discontinue the antibiotics as they most likely have compromised the immune system of my peafowl, regardless of the initial complaint, try giving my birds fresh garlic, and observe the effects. Anxious to strengthen their immune system before the winter, and not seeing much to lose, I decided to give it a shot.”

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Raising heritage chicken breeds

 

Prior to our Great Chicken Adventure, I was utterly unaware of the wealth of heritage breeds out there, with their variations of size, shape, color, plumage, temper, and various characteristics. A chicken is a chicken, I figured; any will cluck and lay                   eggs – so why invest in heritage breeds?

Read more in my latest Mother Earth News post:

“Unlike hybrids, pure-bred heritage chickens breed true. If you start with a flock of, say, Wyandottes, a few years down the road you will still have a flock of Wyandottes, with largely the same qualities of egg production, growth rates, adaptation to climate, and appearance (though you can improve your flock by hatching eggs from your finest, best-looking, hardiest specimens). With mutt chickens, you can always expect surprises.”

Choosing a Chicken Breed

Our chicken-keeping adventure has lasted for some years now, and during this time we have learned a great deal, met some wonderful new friends with whom we bonded over this common interest, and stopped making a fuss over stepping in bird poop. We have even gained the status of something like chicken experts in our local community; but still, when people ask us, “which breed of chickens should I choose?” more often than not we can offer no better answer than “it depends”.

Read more in my latest Mother Earth News post:

“Whichever breed you choose, make sure you get your stock from a reputable hatchery or private breeder. This is the only way to guarantee you get healthy birds (or fresh, good quality hatching eggs) that come from pure bloodlines. Don’t be tempted by unusually low prices, and shun places where birds are kept in substandard conditions, or are looking sickly.”

The Basic Guide to Backyard Livestock

Dear friends,

I am happy to announce that The Basic Guide to Backyard Livestock is now live and available. It contains all I’ve ever written on the subject of raising chickens, arranged in compact, well-organized, easy-to-read form, plus an introductory chapter to goats. As I’m Jewish, naturally I only deal with kosher animals and did not touch on the subject of pigs/rabbits, etc.

The book is available in digital form on Kindle and Payhip, the latter at reduced price, and also in print. I do have to make a disclaimer, however, that the print book is in black and white, as adding color photographs would bump up the price quite unreasonably. I do encourage all who would like a digital copy to purchase from Payhip, as it only takes a tiny commission compared to Amazon, and pays the authors instantly.

I would be infinitely grateful to all who help me spread word about the book by sharing via their blog/social media, or simply among friends who are making their first steps in the direction of raising poultry and goats. People who are interested in review copies are very welcome to contact me.

Chicken Behavioral Problems

Above: a photo of one of our roosters strutting around. This guy has been occasionally known to have some attitude problems, which are quickly adjusted by a well-aimed sweep with a broomstick. Some roosters are a lot more troublesome, however, and may be found incompatible with the backyard flock owner seeking a quiet, peaceful life.

Admittedly, roosters are often the more problematic part of the flock, being noisy, territorial and sometimes aggressive. It is no wonder that the English language boasts of expressions such as “being cocky”. However, I also believe that at least half of all the behavioral management programs in backyard chicken flocks – whether it’s excessive pecking, aggression toward humans or extreme flightiness – can be dealt with by choosing the breed that suits you best.

Read more in my latest Mother Earth News post about chicken behavioral problemsPredators, pests and diseases are not the only challenges a backyard flock owner will have to deal with. Sometimes the problems are originated in the flock itself, and solving them involves lots of creativity, ingenuity and even diplomacy.

Rid your chickens of scaly leg mites

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Those of you who aren’t chicken keepers (and maybe some of you who are) are lucky enough not to know about scaly leg mites, but in our flock they have been a veritable scourge, and extremely labor-intensive to take care of, until I stumbled upon a simple and effective remedy.

“Scaly leg mites are parasites that lodge and reproduce underneath the scales on chickens’ legs. This results in a typical look of uneven, crusty, deformed scales, and can lead to impaired walking, infection, loss of toes and, in extreme cases, even death.

Most home treatment options for scaly leg mites suggest dipping the bird’s legs in mineral oil or petroleum, and then slathering them in Vaseline. The goal of this is to smother the mites. The treatment is then repeated after an interval of a week or two, to take care of the nits that might have hatched in the meantime.”
But, as I said, I’m using something a lot simpler and no less, possibly more effective now. Read more in my Mother Earth News post.  

More peafowl

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Though I didn’t mention this in my previous post about Little Pea (mainly because I didn’t really believe anything would come out of it), on the occasion we found him (or her), we also came across an unattended nest. Since it was dark, and the eggs were cold, I didn’t think they were viable, but a quick candling with our phone flashlight revealed chicks in advanced stages of development, and some feeble movement. After a brief inner struggle,  we decided to take them home and place them in the incubator.

To my surprise, the eggs continued to develop, and yesterday all five of them hatched – even one which had a hairline crack that I repaired with nail polish. The peachicks are now in a brooder hastily made out of an old cardboard box and a heating lamp.

So, all in all, we now have six young peafowl on our hands. When the babies grow up a bit, we hope to be able to move them together with Little Pea.

We don’t know yet where we are going with this unexpected adventure, but we sure are excited about it!