More on growing herbs

I love growing herbs – they are so easy to grow and hardy, and have so many uses and health benefits. Check out my latest Mother Earth News post about growing, harvesting, and using basil:

“Basil is very easy to grow from seed. You can sow the seeds either directly in the soil or in a large pot – placed out of doors or even near a sunny window. In either case, make sure not to buy them too deep. Basil likes warmth and partial sunshine – mine thrives in a spot where it gets sunshine in the morning and shade in the afternoon. Full sun is unnecessary and may even be excessive in hot, dry climates.”

 

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More on Herb Gardening

Luckily for me, I live in an area where the earth never freezes, and thus, every season is a good season for digging! Now contemplating options of enlarging my herb patch (in ways that won’t encourage the chickens to dust bathe and upturn every single one of my young plants).

Read more on herb gardening in my latest Mother Earth News post:

“My herb garden is my favorite, most useful, most versatile and easiest to maintain green patch. Once herbs get going, they’re extremely easy to grow and only require minimal care. They don’t need a lot of space or water, and can be tucked into nooks where you can’t grow much else. Many herbs boast of wonderful medicinal properties and a whole array of culinary uses. In fact, for someone just establishing a garden, I’d recommend to get started with herbs.”

Propagating lavender

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I’ve wanted some lavender for my herb garden for a while now. Lavender has many wonderful medicinal properties, and besides, I love the way it smells. Satchels of dried lavender are lovely to place in a closet or other confined space for a gentle perfume.

You can grow lavender from seed or from cuttings. When choosing cuttings, make sure they are green and fresh, and have no blossoms, as those will divert the plant’s energy from developing roots.

I have tried to propagate lavender in the past by taking cuttings, placing them in a container of water and waiting for them to put out roots, but it never worked (unlike it did with mint and rosemary), but recently I have stumbled upon a much simpler and more effective method: just stick your cuttings in a flower pot with potting soil, place it on a sunny windowsill, keep the soil moist, and the cuttings will take root before long. Once the weather is warm enough, you can transfer your plant outside – around here, this is year round, and my herbs all grow perennially.

The fading summer

A nostalgic post from our old home – a look at our then-garden:

It’s time to take another stroll and feel the strengthening winds of autumn. Pick up some herbs for herb tea…

Look at some of the young trees hopefully awaiting the next season of life and warmth to bear fruit…

And see how the grape vine is waving goodbye with leaves that are falling one by one.

Yes, I know that some of our friends overseas are already shoveling snow, but for us it’s barely fall, and I’m looking forward to cooler weather, rain, and winter flowers.

Choosing a dairy animal

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Those who have been reading my blog for any length of time probably know that I’m itching to get to milking again. And I have faith that G-d will eventually lead us down the path to further food self-sufficiency and sustainability, which will include keeping dairy animals.

Do you dream of having your own delicious milk, cheese and yogurt as well? Do you keep, or plan to keep, goats or cows? Are you struggling to choose between the two? Read my latest Mother Earth News post for more insight.

“This is a question many homesteaders seriously grapple with when they consider getting a dairy animal. Goats or cows? Cows or goats? There is no one clear-cut answer for all, but rather, many points to be considered while you make the decision about what kind of dairy animal is the right one for you.”

PS: Today, my thoughts are with my American friends as I remember September 11-th. The world is with you. Let’s not let evil get the upper hand.

Late Summer

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August is approaching its middle, and while the days wan steadily shorter, I am looking forward to longer, cooler nights, autumn rains, and the fresh greenery in the landscape that will come with them.

Late summer is always a busy time for me, as I wrap up my spring and early summer garden (and prepare for a second growing season, that will last well into November). Last week, I pulled up my exhausted tomatoes, after having picked the last of the produce, planted some basil, and started more tomato plants indoors. The first spring chicks are almost pullets now, and two of my hens are sitting once more, probably for the last time this season.

The time of the year is turning me into quite a scatterbrain, and concise writing efforts are getting put off for cooler, serener times, but here are two of my latest Mother Earth News posts for your perusal:

Drying Produce – Herbs are one of the easiest things to dry. Simply cut a good-sized bunch, wash it thoroughly, tie by the stems and hang to dry – outside if the weather is sunny, inside if you have frequent rains or live in a very humid climate. In a few days, depending on the weather and humidity level, you should have a bunch of perfectly dry herbs ready to be stored in a tightly sealed glass jar or plastic bag. You can keep them as leaves for tea or crush them into powder for seasoning.

Dealing With House and Garden Pests – Having lived in town for most of my life, I experienced a kind of shock when we married and moved into a little house on a plot of land. The critters that have invaded our premises over the years could form a small menagerie: we’ve had lizards, snakes, black scorpions, giant yellow centipedes, mice, rats, spiders and, of course, a whole host of insects – beetles, ants, woodlice… you name it.